Raffael, Sandro, and Lars are familiar figures in the underground party circuit for a while now. We had the opportunity to sit together before their label showcase at Polaris and talk about the past, the future and the actual situation in the electronic music scene they are standing for.

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The first Sunday Breakfast Party took place 6 years ago. Now it’s not only an international party label but a record label as well. How did you come up with the idea to make a party on a Sunday afternoon?

Actually, we used to celebrate Sandro’s birthday with a bunch of people. But we always thought that something is missing. Almost every after-hours was pretty messed up and always took place in some kind of basement. Eventually, the idea arose not to organize these typical after-hours. So we looked for a location with daylight. That makes the atmosphere much more energetic. It was also important for us to set the opening times on the afternoon which really makes a difference too.

We live in a pretty fast moving world. This is even more drastic in our sub-culture. How do you perceive the actual situation in our music-scene?

It has always been this way. But you will always have people around you who are seriously interested in music. Music connects people. It is still enormously important to us that we truly care for our guests so the mentality to have a good time together persists.

It has been already 15 years that you make events together. Is there something that makes you sentimental when you think about the past?

Nowadays it has become really difficult to find an appropriate location. We remember the Club Rohstofflager, which was a discarded raw materials warehouse. In my opinion that was one of the best clubs ever in Zurich. Unfortunately, locations like the Rohstofflager tend to disappear more and more.

There used to be a bunch of explicit techno clubs, house clubs, hip-hop clubs and so on. Today it doesn’t really make a difference in what club you choose to go. Everything has become so mixed. That’s why you often see people attending parties not because they specifically like the music played. There was a certain euphoria around at parties a few years ago but unfortunately, you hardly see that anymore.

For a long time you chose to hold your parties at Vior. Now you decided to move to Kaufleuten. Do you plan to continue to make Sunday Breakfast even bigger?

Our goal was to create a familiar atmosphere again after Vior. We still want to stay true to our concept. So we found ourselves again at „Kaufleuten“ because it offers the possibility to switch between 3 different floors depending on our needs and one floor does have daylight. On Christmas, we are able to host 900 people which are possible on the biggest floor. The other floors provide space for about 300 guests.

You used to follow a straight line in terms of your line-ups. Almost every artist you invite plays regularly at your events. Do you aspire to get more experimental or does this exactly define Sunday Breakfast?

Since we created Sunday Breakfast we are so happy and grateful to count many artists as our friends. Their music and their personalities really won our heart. They will always be our guests this party or another. We used to make parties a lot more frequently which we passed in small locations. So yes if we plan to make smaller parties we will, of course, be open to new, talented artists. But we like to trust artists that we already know well when it comes bigger events.

If you had to name that one unforgettable party – which one would it be?

Actually, it wasn’t really a Sunday Breakfast party already. It was a party where we came up with the idea to start making public events. It was Sandro’s birthday and an indescribable vibe came up with the time. You could feel the people’s pure enjoyment and everybody was truly connected with each other with the focus on the music. We will always keep this in mind. Happenings like this will never stop to motivate us in what we’re doing.


Listen to Sandro Kuhne’s live-cut from the Polaris Festival- Label Showcase

Pictures by: Costantino Bedin